Genevieve Searle was raped and suicidal. This is her story and she is resilient.

Trigger Warning: The Resilience Global Project provides an open space for people to share their personal experiences. Some content in this podcast may include topics that you may find difficult. The listener’s discretion is advised.

About the Guest:

Genevieve Searle is best known for being the Optimisation Queen and has spoken on the TEDx Talk stage with “How to Thrive in an Era of Uncertainty.”

She mentors game-changing women in aligning with their genetic genius so they can actualize their soul purpose. Genevieve combines cutting-edge epigenetic & hormonal profiling, ancestral alchemy, embodied movement, functional breathing & deep soul work.

She is the #1 best-selling author of: Embrace Your Feminessence: A Must Read for Every Woman Who Wants to Embrace Their Power, Women Gone, WILD Wealth Edition, & Illuminate Your Feminessence.

She is also a ph360 Endorsed Health Coach, Buteyko Breathing Instructor, Ancestral Lineage Guide, Thor Laser Practitioner, Flowstate & Ecstatic Breathwork Facilitator, Transformation Catalyst, Nutrition Mentor, Colon Hydrotherapist and 20 year veteran of Women’s Wisdom work.

Working with Genevieve comes with the warning label “Enter at your own risk, you will not be the same woman after working with me.”

When she isn’t speaking on massive stages she can be found dancing, writing poetry, being a conscious mother to her 3 sons, ally to her lover of over 20 years and generally being fabulous. 

Links:

www.facebook.com/theoptimisationqueen/

www.instagram.com/genevieve_theoptimisationqueen/

www.linkedin.com/in/genevieve-searle-optimisation-queen

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Transcript
Blair Kaplan Venables:

trigger warning, the Resilience Project provides an open space for people to share their personal experiences. Some content in this podcast may include topics that you may find difficult, the listeners discretion is advised.

Blair Kaplan Venables:

Hello friends, welcome to radical resilience, a weekly show where I Blair Kaplan Venables have inspirational conversations with people who have survived life's most challenging times. We all have the ability to be resilient and bounce forward from a difficult experience. And these conversations prove just that, get ready to dive into these life changing moments while strengthening your resilience muscle and getting raw and real.

Blair Kaplan Venables:

Welcome back to another episode of radical resilience. It's me, Blair Kaplan Venables, and I'm here today with another amazing guest. Today's guest is a co author with me in the woman going wild wealth addition book, and I've never met her in person, but we've become internet pen pals, or Zoom pals. Thanks zoom health. Her name is Genevieve Searle. And I'm so excited. First of all, you can't see this because it's audio only but she is a sequence hat on and sequence like Sparkle is my favorite color. But besides her wearing my favorite color, she's best known for being the optimization queen and and she has spoken on TEDx Talk stages about how to thrive in an era of uncertainty. She mentors game changing women and aligning with their generic genius so they can actualize their soul's purpose. She's a number one best selling author of multiple books. And when she is speaking on massive stages, she can be found dancing, writing poetry, being a conscious mother to her three sons allied to her lover of over 20 years and generally just being fabulous. And I would agree because every time that we're in the same Zoom Room, are chatting online. She is absolutely fabulous. So I It is a pleasure to introduce to Genevieve Hi.

Genevieve Searle:

Hey, you. Um, yeah, genetic genetics. Genius is what it is the thing you said generic, which

Blair Kaplan Venables:

I did, maybe you know what, I'm not even gonna lie. I have an ear infection right now. And I just like went to the doctor, and I'm on a lot of meds. And like, I did not sleep last night because of it. So she's not a generic genius. Well, she is a general genius and everything but sorry, genetic. Genetic gene. What's a genetic genius?

Genevieve Searle:

Yeah. So it's helped people align to that line, genetic genius. So I've worked with epigenetics, epigenetics. And, yeah, so we can talk about that, because that's super powerful in the realm of resilience, like really?

Blair Kaplan Venables:

Yes. Oh, we have. We have so much to talk about today. And I'm sorry for that. Because you're not a generic genius.

Genevieve Searle:

No, one's a generic genius. There are no generic.

Blair Kaplan Venables:

I'm just a human who's bad at spelling and reading. But you know, Genevieve, like why don't you share her story?

Genevieve Searle:

Yeah, beautiful. I guess if we kind of backtrack a bit, you know, we could backtrack a long time, because I'm going to intergenerational epigenetic. So we could actually go through ancestry. For everyone, you know, everyone starts be up before they even were a twinkle in their mother's eye. And, but for me, I guess my personal journey of discovery, this life was really after the age of 18. I was right. I've also been abused by a neighbor when I was four. But I've suppressed that. And I didn't have a recall of that until I was about 15. And then, and then I was right at 18. And, you know, it was it was a really challenging time. There were the rape itself wasn't a hugely traumatic thing, but it there was so much, you know, not compared to some race that I, you know, that we hear of, but it really hit my sense of self and the way it was handled in particular, you know, through no fault of their own. It just wasn't handled in a way that my system needed it. And so there was a lot of issues embedded in my system around self worth and value and I became really quite depressed. I was medicated on Zoloft for a number of years and suicidal tendencies. There was always a cord or had eating disorders for a number of years laxative abuse, you know, really just participated in quite destructive behavior generally. And then There was a point when I was 21. And I was working in a place called Hamilton Island in Australia. And I was lying in an empty pool. It's a resort island, and I was lying and an empty pool looking up the stars. And I realized at that moment very clearly that I had three choices, I could choose to continue as I was going, I could kill myself, or I could get better. Continuing as I was going with a non option, killing myself, as I said, Before, there was something that was always this this channel call like this internal faith, as I know, things can get better, doesn't have to be like this. And so that left option through which was to get better. And it really was a turning point in my focus, where I started to, I just became the limitlessly committed to healing. And I was dealing not only with mental and emotional issues, but I was also dealing with quite a lot of just chronic physical issues. And so is this twofold path because even though my mom was a psychologist,

Genevieve Searle:nd discovering and going down:Genevieve Searle:

My car Hey, guys, what do you need? And I said, Okay, so today, we need timeline out in the sunshine, we need to do lots of tea, listen to music, and just have a really nice day and not do any work, please. And so like, literally, that's just what I do. I just put out the day, and, and looked after my son looked after my system, but it was almost like I was tending to these molecules, like they're my little children. I was like, Oh, I'm just gonna take care of you. I'm just gonna take care of you. It's gonna be okay. And you know, really, by the end of the day, it wasn't completely resolved. And there was still some stuff going on that I needed to deal with. But my system was much more resilient because I'd looked after it in the way that it needed. And I hadn't gone into Oh my God, here I go again, I'm just going into like another depression and how am I going to get out of this? And why do I do this all the time, and I'm so wrong. And you know, that spiral of self judgment and self criticism now it's literally Oh, hey, okay, cool. Serotonin is low. How do I work with my biochemistry to help me and then from that place when I do feel resilient so I can tackle the issues that I need to deal with? Yeah, blah, blah, blah. So

Blair Kaplan Venables:

that Yeah, wow, that was a lot to unpack. But thank you, I think like there's a few different things I'd like to tap on so with like with you discovering epi genetics and diving into that. How has that made you understand the traumas you've experienced like your rape?

Genevieve Searle:

Yeah. Um first of all, taking away that the idea that there was something wrong with me that was or that it was my fault. or even, it even helps me to have. I mean, one of the issues that I had early on was because I internalized rather than than externalized. It meant that I went straight actually straight to forgiveness and compassion without feeling the rage. And that led to some depression pieces, quite significantly, actually. So I did have to go through this process of permitting myself to feel enraged about it. And I working with embodied movement and ecstatic dance in particular, it was really useful for that. But back to the epigenetics what it shifted, was actually just putting what here we go, I'm just getting this now actually, I haven't been asked this question. It's really great question. What it did was allowed me to go you know what, terrible things happen. Terrible things happen to everyone. Through their lives, we live in a traumatized culture, we are all every single person in the world is traumatized. And if they weren't prior to two years ago, they certainly are now, one way or another, where we're just as traumatized people doing the best or the worst that we can. And it doesn't really matter who you are, you are not going to escape some level of trauma through your life. So allowing that to be actually just part of the human experience, and made it just like, just just lighter. And then the epigenetics then allows me to stabilize my system so that I feel a really cool level of resilience. And then that means that when challenges happen when trauma happens when I go through, and you know, I feel like I have processes right now, but you know, when I was unpacking that, and it didn't carry the same density or punch because I could hold myself through it.

Blair Kaplan Venables:

Mm hmm. Wow, that's really beautiful. So if someone now is interested in learning epigenetics not only is it a tool for the future, but it can help heal traumas from the past.

Genevieve Searle:

Ah, I've got full body goosebumps as you say that like

Blair Kaplan Venables:

I love it. I'm a Goosebumps giver. Totally on my Yeah,

Genevieve Searle:

my whole skin's Gone. Gone on. Absolutely. It's so powerful because, particularly for people who, you know, are in the self, the internalization, the self blame the self judgment. It's like, what if we actually there's what if there's nothing wrong with us? What if there has never been anything wrong with us? Like, for me, that was revolutionary? Yeah, coming to that really clear place not apply. And and because it was associated with my biology. I was like, Yeah, of course, I'm going to tend towards depression, if I'm not looking after my serotonin and hard things happen. Of course, that's just part of how I'm wired. But the beautiful thing is, there's always a flip side, right? There's always, you know, there's always two sides of the same coin. So yes, I do have a tendency to lean towards overwhelming depression. And that's also it's also that particular wine that makes me incredibly empathic. It makes me a capable of seeing a friend, like really seeing the interconnectedness of things, really seeing the patterns of things, being able to hold really strong space for other people in their own stuff, being able to see the value and reflect the value that I see in someone else. Because as I struggled with worthiness, which is actually a core wound of serotonin dominant people, it's like self worth. So part of my gift is I see the value in someone else, I see the work in someone else, and I can reflect that back to them. So you know, there's always this. There's, this is the genius part, like when we when we understand that, for every kind of, I guess, in inverted commas, negative quality that we have, there's a direct flip that is also really positive, and that we wouldn't get we If out the ABA, they come together.

Blair Kaplan Venables:

That's really beautiful. So I'm sure listeners are like googling or like pondering like more, more information about epigenetics needs to be consumed. If someone's new to this, they've never heard of it, or they maybe heard about it. And now you're peeking their curiosity further, like, what what do you recommend? For those who are entering the world of epigenetics? Like, what are the first steps? Someone who is curious should take?

Genevieve Searle:

Yeah, so the profiling technology, they work with this cutting edge, and I don't know anyone else. Like it's a, it's a technology platform that I that I work with, but it's not my platform. So that platform is called ph 360. And you can find it easily by just going to my website is probably the fastest way. And I give a little brief just description at the beginning of that to help you kind of understand how it works. And then you can link through there. That most of the epigenome, the information about epigenetics that's out in the world, most of the books does not actually cover this piece. This is really like at the forefront of holistic wellness and medicine. And it's there actually, at the moment, we've got unify peace week on and they have teamed up pH a, it's an app called precision Health Alliance have teamed up with unify. And they're doing some incredible work with unify working with like Deepak Chopra, and the Dalai Lama to, really, and it's on mental health. So it's mental health week. And they're, you know, they're bringing this information to the world, because this is the stuff that people need. This is a game changer is

Blair Kaplan Venables:

honestly, it's a resilience tool.

Genevieve Searle:

It's a massive resilience tool, massive. And I know this year, I went through like a real crumbling of my 20 year relationship. And in most scenarios, we would have either broke either broken up left, or we would have gone into, you know, staying together, but not either not really living up potential, you know, that's the conventional and cultural options that we have. But this technology allowed us to understand our how, you know, we went I went into it so much more deeply in that. And yes, our relationship dynamic had to shift dramatically. But we've been where I am now to reimagine what our relationship can be. And it's actually feeling really exciting. But it can only happen because we now understand not only how each other away, but actually deeply understand ourselves, and start taking personal responsibility for how to look after ourselves. And then we're not and from that place, we can love each other from a really free sovereign place. So it's incredibly powerful information. But yeah, a lot of the information about epigenetics out in the world is, you know, Bruce Lipton has written some amazing stuff. Having mental blanks here, who else is,

Blair Kaplan Venables:

well, you people can just come to your website, the link is in our show notes. And if they're curious, they can probably hop on a call with you. And I mean, I think I think there are people in this world who are the walking wounded who thrive on that, and it's their identity. And then there's the people who are, you know, wounded and want to heal, and those who are wounded, who have trauma and want to heal who are consuming the tools and exploring alternative ways to heal because traditional therapy isn't enough. Yeah, you know, this is gonna really resonate with them. And I'm excited to dive into this with you when the time is right when I have a break from some travel, and I think it's brilliant Genevieve and so the shownotes have, you know, Genevieve links so you can click on those the links there and, and dive into her world? Do you have one last piece of advice for people who are on their path to be more resilient

Genevieve Searle:

just drop into my heart for that one. I guess just understanding that even though they're you, you might be facing some real challenges and might be working through some, some very difficult things that number one, you're not broken, that there's nothing wrong with you. And that woven into your, your story and woven into your experience and woven into you you have this incredible elixir of potential that no one else in the world carries like there is a brilliance to you that no one else has and but it's really just a matter of finding the pathways to uncover that. And when you do, everything changes.

Blair Kaplan Venables:

I love that. I just wrote that down elixir of potential. Yeah, that's so beautiful. Genevieve, thank you so much for coming on at radical resilience. I appreciate you and the time you took with your sparkly hat, chat with me, you know, on the opposite side of the world, legit the opposite side of the world. And I want to thank everyone for tuning into another episode of radical resilience. We do this every week, same time, same place. It is okay to not be okay. You don't have to go through it alone. You're not alone. And you are resilient. Thank you.

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